Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Lafayette




Lafayette Monument, Baltimore, copr William Cook, 1982


This is one of those pieces that never got out of the studio.  I think I may have tried it once on a portfolio site, but other than that it's been buried since 1982.   One problem with it is the paper it's on.  At the time I could care less what I drew on.--part of my ongoing attitude problem regarding certain puffy art approaches that require only the best materials, most expensive media and so forth.  I was teaching myself how to draw, and wasn't interested in the fact that anything I might produce might have warranted expensive paper.  This is the nineth piece in this series, and the last thing I ever did anything on junk paper.  It's the least I could do.  

I'm not all puffed up I tell you.  The ink pens I used were rolling writers.  Cheaper than dirt.  These marks are impossible with proper ink pens.  The style is way too rapid, and the frantic but controlled  result of the linework is what I was dealing with.  I'm still amazed at how this is possible.  Perhaps it's because the sensation was that I wasn't the creator.  It was more like watching TV.  Sure there were some structural formalities followed.
But when the ink came out I had to hold on for my own safety.

OK so I've gotten a little puffed.  Besides, when I went to the good paper, wow.  the rolling writers really showed their stuff--black gold, swimmin pools, movie stars.  Calm down Jethro.  I was buying the pens by the box.  The intense drawing created friction that would literally heat up the points, and their little balls would drop out.  I hated when that happened.  No holes ever appeared in the good paper, I'm happy to report.
Don't try this at home.       

As for Lafayette, remember the Frenchy in The Patriot?  That was Lafayette.  He was all over the place around these parts, leading whole armies through the forests and so forth.  He is quite a figure in American History; this monument to him located at the foot of the George Washington monument at the center (more or less) of Baltimore, The Big Banana 
(talk about puffed up).    


\\///\  



10 comments:

RH Carpenter said...

I've got a picture in my mind now of you working feverishly with these pens, tossing them aside as they lose their tips due to overheating! Great drawing - your mark-making is otherworldly :)

William Cook said...

Clubs. It's like working with clubs I tell you (remember Paul Newman in "What a Way To Go?"). All that intensity, and if my wife were to come up and say "dinner", I'd jump out of my skin in fright. I'd say make some noise for Gods sake. Thanks Rhonda--all the best.

John Brisson said...

So...you seriously have things like this just laying around! Wow!!

William Cook said...

Hi John--Yup (OK they're in drawers).

L.W.Roth, said...

Dramatic drawings Bill. As realistic and precise they are, your abstract forms are present. Pen work is lovely in its looseness. --Isn't a bitch when we come across drawings of merit done on crap paper? What were we thinking?

William Cook said...

LW--Yes it is. Prior to that point I had no problem working on any junk around. I painted on dry wall pieces! I did a series of falling people on brown wrapping paper (free in the sculpture studio at TSU). Ever notice what a beautiful surface chipboard is? I'm so ashamed. Oh wait. That was thirty two years ago. Now not so much.

JANE MINTER said...

full of admiration ..great dwg bill

William Cook said...

Hi Jane--So happy to hear from you! Thanks for checking in!

John Simlett said...

Great work, Bill, it's very dramatic which often clashes with accuracy ... but it doesn't in this case for sure.

1981 was when I first started drawing seriously in pen and ink. Thanks for sharing I really enjoy your work.

William Cook said...

Yes, that is getting to be a while ago. You know, regarding accuracy, that in some sense at least, to render something accurately would look distorted and not accurate at all. Hence the drama [and other tricks] to make our case believable. Also, in another sense, does the accuracy dictate the picture or does the drama dictate the accuracy? I suppose it goes to the primacy of motive. Great food for thought, John, always a pleasure.